iOS vs. Android: The Case for iOS

iphones

Last week my co-founder Brandon laid out the case for Android. While I agree that Android has some benefits like customizability, there are a few key factors that put the iPhone ahead.

Reliability & Smoothness

The iPhone is a reliable machine that runs at about the same performance throughout its lifetime. There’s a reason iPhone users rarely turn off their phone, and that’s because it performs reliably even after heavy usage. With reliability comes a consistent user experience, providing a smooth user interface. With Android, I’ve seen many phones start out zippy but degrade over time or lag periodically.

Updates

Apple has done a great service to developers and users alike by essentially forcing you to update your phone. Updates are simple on the iPhone, and users are quick to update iOS for new features. For developers, this means they don’t have to support the older versions of iOS, which increases time spent on things that matter. Android phones usually are customized on a phone-by-phone basis, meaning the version of Android they run becomes outdated and doesn’t get updated as frequently, which is bad for developers and users alike and probably only good for new phone sales.

Simplicity

iOS is very consistent and simple across apps. Apple’s design standard has made apps converge on “best” practices (sometimes they might not be the best, but they’re common). An example of this is swiping on an item in a list. The home screen on iOS is quite simple, where each app gets its own space. The counter-point for Android is customizability, but that comes at the expense of simplicity. Personally, I like an environment to be plug and play, where I can start using something and be productive in a matter of minutes and continue to be productive over time. iOS does this well.

Other Benefits

  • Quality of apps (largely due to Apple screening every app in the App Store)
  • Integration with Mac. If you use a MacBook, you’ll agree that some of the desktop apps don’t feel complete unless they’re used with the phone (i.e. Messages, Notes, etc.).
  • The lure of Android is always there to explore something unfamiliar, but I’m a “no-nonsense” user, so you can leave me here…I’ll be ok.

What are you favorite or least-favorite parts about owning an iPhone or an Android? Let us know in the comments below!

Sincerely,
Matt from the Bunch

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *