iOS vs. Android: The Case for iOS

iphones

Last week my co-founder Brandon laid out the case for Android. While I agree that Android has some benefits like customizability, there are a few key factors that put the iPhone ahead.

Reliability & Smoothness

The iPhone is a reliable machine that runs at about the same performance throughout its lifetime. There’s a reason iPhone users rarely turn off their phone, and that’s because it performs reliably even after heavy usage. With reliability comes a consistent user experience, providing a smooth user interface. With Android, I’ve seen many phones start out zippy but degrade over time or lag periodically.

Updates

Apple has done a great service to developers and users alike by essentially forcing you to update your phone. Updates are simple on the iPhone, and users are quick to update iOS for new features. For developers, this means they don’t have to support the older versions of iOS, which increases time spent on things that matter. Android phones usually are customized on a phone-by-phone basis, meaning the version of Android they run becomes outdated and doesn’t get updated as frequently, which is bad for developers and users alike and probably only good for new phone sales.

Simplicity

iOS is very consistent and simple across apps. Apple’s design standard has made apps converge on “best” practices (sometimes they might not be the best, but they’re common). An example of this is swiping on an item in a list. The home screen on iOS is quite simple, where each app gets its own space. The counter-point for Android is customizability, but that comes at the expense of simplicity. Personally, I like an environment to be plug and play, where I can start using something and be productive in a matter of minutes and continue to be productive over time. iOS does this well.

Other Benefits

  • Quality of apps (largely due to Apple screening every app in the App Store)
  • Integration with Mac. If you use a MacBook, you’ll agree that some of the desktop apps don’t feel complete unless they’re used with the phone (i.e. Messages, Notes, etc.).
  • The lure of Android is always there to explore something unfamiliar, but I’m a “no-nonsense” user, so you can leave me here…I’ll be ok.

What are you favorite or least-favorite parts about owning an iPhone or an Android? Let us know in the comments below!

Sincerely,
Matt from the Bunch

iOS vs. Android: The Case for Android

android

Which is better: the iPhone or Android? Well, if we say iPhone vs. Android it’s actually as if we’re comparing apples and oranges. iPhone is the name of the device made by Apple. Android is an operating system (OS) made by Google. For the purposes of this blog post, let’s discuss iOS and Android, because there are too many devices that run Android to compare devices, and people usually argue about the OS, not the device it’s running on.

Both operating systems are pretty niche, in my opinion. I believe that’s why this argument can get so heated sometimes. iOS users are typically (in my experience) no-nonsense people who want a quality device that won’t slow them down in any way. This can range from cool hipsters who are more occupied with their other hobbies to worry about a cell phone to older people (like my grandparents) who just want a reliable device to handle the occasional call. Android users tend to be more into tinkering (with a few exceptions here and there). There’s the possibility of rooting the device (gaining root access to the device to bypass certain rules the OS has baked in), and there are undoubtedly more customizations to be made on the Android platform.

So, which is better? I’ve personally owned both. I’ve owned numerous Android devices but temporarily switched to an iPhone 5 for a few years. While there are great things about each, I would like to argue that the Android operating system is superior to iOS. But after you’ve heard my reasoning, you should comment below to let me know what you think!

iOS has a beautiful interface. I will never tell anybody differently. iOS is reliable and quick, all the time. There’s a reason no-nonsense users tend to find themselves on iPhones. iOS is simple. It’s clean. It’s very sexy. There’s no doubt about that. However, for me, this is where it ends. Its simplicity and beauty only go so far for me. I need more.

The Android platform can almost compete with iOS in terms of being clean and beautiful. I’ll admit that it’s not as fast and responsive and can get bogged down under heavy usage. However, this is rare and doesn’t at all ruin the system for me. Where it wins, though, is its customizability. I’m not talking about the ability to root and flash different system images on the devices. And I’m just talking about sheer customization and user experience. When you use an Android, you get the feeling that the phone was made for you. Google Now will tell you where you parked your car, what you wanted to buy at the store (via Wunderlist integration), what your schedule looks like today, how your stocks are doing, how your team did last night, and display articles of interest (that are actually relevant), all on the same screen! Oh, and saying ‘OK Google’ and searching the web actually returns super accurate results, unlike Siri. The great thing about Android is that if you don’t want to customize it or use all of its features, that’s totally fine. The phone still will deliver the same value that an iPhone does.

Also, you can get a phone running the latest Android version for a few hundred bucks, while iPhones cost an arm and a leg.

But this is just my opinion; what do I know? Let me know what you think–and why–by commenting below!

Sincerely,
Brandon from the Bunch